Friday, 30 September 2016

The Father of all Experiments!

We all know there is one God, the creator and that he is within every one of us. And God has made us all alike. If he is within every one of us, and if there is only one God who can only be found within ourselves; there cannot be more than one path leading back to the Father. It has got to be the same path in every person regardless of the religion, caste, creed or colour, because the Lord has made us all alike. For those who try to seek him within, there is only one path. Those who try to seek him outside are just lost in illusion, and that will lead them nowhere at all.

The Lord is within every one of us. The path leading back to the Lord is also within every one of us. Our spiritual journey starts from the soles of our feet and ends at the top of our head. In the body, the soul and the mind are knotted together here, at the eye centre, in the forehead. From here our mind spreads into the whole creation through the nine apertures: the two eyes, two ears, two holes of the nose, the mouth and the two lower apertures. Through these nine apertures our thoughts are spread into the whole creation.

How are our thoughts spread?

We are always thinking about one thing or another. The mind is never still. No matter how much you close yourself off in the darkest room, you will not be there - your mind will be scattered into the whole creation. And whomever we are thinking about, their form appears before us. If I am thinking about my child, my child's form will appear before me. If I am thinking about my wife, my friends, I will start visualizing their forms. Automatically we start visualizing the faces of whomever we are thinking about, and slowly and slowly we get attached to them, so much so that we start dreaming about them. And at the time of death, all their forms appear before us like a cinema screen.

Those attachments and that love pull us back to the level of creation after our death. Mystics & saints tell us that unless we are in love with the Lord, unless we are attached to him, we will never be able to go back to the level of the Lord. They tell us that with the same method by which you are attached to the creation, you should try to attach yourself to the Creator. The mind is in the habit of doing ‘simran’ - thinking day and night about what we see is known as ‘simran’. And whatever we try to visualize is known as doing ‘dhyan’ (concentrating). So the mind is in the habit of doing simran and dhyan, but simran and dhyan about whom? Those faces, those objects, all that we see in this creation, are perishable. So mystics tell us to think about the Lord. Visualize the form of the Father. By the same process we use all the time, you try to withdraw your consciousness back to the eye centre.

The mind is fond of pleasures, and it has become a slave of the senses because it is very fond of the pleasures of the senses. Unless the mind gets a better pleasure than the sensual pleasures, it refuses to leave the sensual pleasures.

The Lord has kept within every one of us at the eye centre that better pleasure, which is known by different names. It is referred to as the holy ghost, word, spirit, name in the west; Indian mystics generally call it shabad or naam. Some call it akaash baani, hari-kirtan, nirmal naad, some call it kalmaa, ism-e-azam or baang-e-asmani, some call it sarosh, but we are not concerned with words at all.

That divine melody is within every one of us here at the eye centre. When, with the help of simran and dhyan as taught to us by the mystics or saints, we withdraw our consciousness back to the eye centre, then we are in touch with that divine melody within, which has its own sound and its own light. With the help of the sound, we know the direction of our house within. With the help of the light, we know the path which we have to travel. So slowly and slowly, stage by stage, we start making progress within ourselves.

In order to go back to the Father, we have to withdraw our consciousness back to the eye centre. This is known as meditation - withdrawing our consciousness from the nine apertures and holding our attention here at the eye centre and attaching our attention, our consciousness, to that divine melody or divine light within. The more we concentrate at the eye centre, the more we will be in touch with that divine melody and divine light within. The more we enjoy that divine light and divine melody within, the more we start withdrawing from the attachments of the creation. Attachment to the divine melody automatically creates the feeling of detachment from the senses, detachment from the creation. Only attachment can create detachment in us. Detachment can never create attachment in anyone.
When we are attached to that divine melody within, it starts pulling us away from sensual pleasures, from worldly love, from worldly pleasures. That is why it is known as amrit – because from it we get immortal life. Some call it the ‘living water’, some call it aabe-hayaat. Once we taste it, we become free from birth and death. So that is shabad and naam, which the Lord has placed within every one of us here at the eye centre.

But unless we withdraw and hold our attention at the eye centre, we cannot taste that nectar within, we cannot enjoy that silent music which the Lord has placed within every one of us, and we cannot be one with that divine light within. Once we are one with that divine light and one with that divine music or divine melody within, then automatically detachment from this creation starts in our mind. That attachment to the divine melody starts detaching us from the creation and slowly and slowly attaching us to the Creator. This is meditation; this is the process which we have to follow.

You see, at the time of death we have to go through the same process as we do at the time of meditation. Whenever the soul, leaves the body, it has been withdrawn to the eye centre, in the forehead – only then does the soul leave the body. And at the time of meditation also, we try to withdraw our consciousness back to the eye centre. That is why meditation is known as a living death. It is the same process which we have to follow at the time of death. That is why death is not painful for a disciple of a true living master - because he is passing through the same process every day. Actually, meditation is nothing but a preparation for death. We are trying to withdraw our consciousness back to the eye centre every day, and that is the same process we have to follow at the time of death. That is why Saint Paul said, “I die daily.” Every day I withdraw my consciousness to the eye centre. That is why it is known as living death, dying while living.

Withdrawing your consciousness to the eye centre is dying, while you are living. So both are painful; but if you practice it, you overcome this pain gradually, and then there is no pain at all. That is why the process of simran (a mantra – given by a true living master) is very slow. Through simran, slowly and slowly we are trying to withdraw our consciousness from body. At the time of death, if you are not in the habit of withdrawing your consciousness from the body, the soul suddenly comes to the eye centre and leaves the body, so naturally it is painful. If you put a cloth on a bush full of thorns and then pull the cloth off, the whole cloth will be torn to pieces. But if you remove the cloth from first one thorn and then another thorn, slowly and slowly, one by one, there is no pain at all to the cloth and it is not torn. Doing the practice of simran and dhyan, meditation, is removing the cloth from the thorns slowly and slowly, one by one. Our whole consciousness is spread throughout the whole body, and slowly and slowly we are trying to withdraw it. With gradual withdrawal there is not much pain, but if you have to withdraw suddenly, then the pain becomes unbearable. As I said, if you pull the cloth from the bush, it will be torn. That is why some people faint at the time of meditation, you see; they concentrate with intense emotion or devotion. In discourse or otherwise, they become so full of emotion and devotion that they concentrate, and they are not in the habit of concentrating. The moment they see a little light, they just faint- they can't stand it. It becomes unbearable for them, so they faint.

If a thousand watt bulb is suddenly shone into your eyes, you can't stand that light- you'll faint. But if we show one candle, then two candles, then three candles, every day, slowly and slowly, you'll get into the habit of seeing that light, eventually you'll be able to see a thousand candles without hurting your eyes. That happens slowly, with practice. Similarly, with the method of simran that has been adopted by saints, we have to withdraw our consciousness - which has been spreading the whole world for ages and ages - very slowly, so that we do not faint or hurt ourselves or get so frightened that we stop sitting in meditation. If suddenly you see a light or you hear a very pulling sound and you can't stand it, you might become so frightened that you stop sitting in meditation. But if slowly and slowly you see a little ray of light and hear a little sound, gradually you become used to it, and then you are able to bear all that. You start enjoying all that. That is why this method is slow, but sure, and there is no injury to anybody. All this can be accomplished through the grace of the Lord and a true living master only.

SOURCE - “Spiritual Perspectives Vol.2” @: http://www.scienceofthesoul.org/product_p/en-230-s.htm
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